Northern Lights

Duration
• Hourly based service.
Price
Taxi for 1 - 4 people
• Hourly Rate = 10.000 ISK

Taxi for 5 - 8 people
• Hourly Rate = 13.000 ISK
Included
• English speaking driving guide.
• Taxi Vehicle, Fuel, Road & Parking fees.
Not Included
• Admission Tickets to Museums, Bathing Areas & Activity Tours.
Payment & Cancellation
• You pay at the end of the tour (Cash or Credit).
• You can cancel whenever and without cost.

Tour Details

The ideal location for sightings varies and excursion leaders are skilled in "hunting" the lights, finding locations where conditions are best for seeing them on any given night.

There are no guarantees that you will see the Northern Lights during your stay, but in most cases, sightings are immediately improved outside populated areas, especially away from the light-pollution of the capital. A number of hotels in the country side offer special Northern Lights wake-up service.

First thing first, clear skies. If the weather cooperates, you are already half-way there. You can always check weather conditions, cloud coverage and Aurora activity on the Icelandic Met Office Website.

Camera & Settings

As far as equipment goes, the most important thing you can bring is a tripod to avoid the dreaded shaken photo syndrome. If you don’t have a cable release, set your camera’s self-timer to two or ten seconds shutter delay, if available.

There is no single setting for your camera that ensures great captures, but if you have manual options, you are probably best served with experimenting with various combinations of ISO, aperture, and exposure settings. As a rule of thumb, ISO setting between 800 and 3200, aperture between f/2.8 and f/5.6, and shutter speed at between 15 seconds and 30 seconds have proven effective.

Different combinations may give very different results. Higher ISO setting will allow you to capture faster exposures, but may also result in grainier images, for examples. Note that shutter speeds of above 15 seconds will result in slight star movement. Wider angle lenses are usually more versatile in low light settings, but longer lenses give you different options for compositions. Make sure that you remove all lens filters, as they may distort images. You will probably get the best results with manual setting for infinite focal length

What are they?

When lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. They are known as "Aurora borealis" in the north and "Aurora australis" in the south. 

Auroral displays appear in many colors although pale green and pink are the most common. Shades of red, yellow, green, blue, and violet have been reported. The lights appear in many forms from patches or scattered clouds of light to streamers, arcs, rippling curtains or shooting rays that light up the sky with an eerie glow.

What is the cause?

The Northern Lights are actually the result of collisions between gaseous particles in the Earth's atmosphere with charged particles released from the sun's atmosphere. Colour variations are due to the type of gas particles that are colliding. The most common auroral color, a pale yellowish-green, is produced by oxygen molecules located about 60 miles above the earth. Rare, all-red auroras are produced by high-altitude oxygen, at heights of up to 200 miles. Nitrogen produces blue or purplish-red aurora.

The connection between the Northern Lights and sunspot activity has been suspected since about 1880. Thanks to research conducted since the 1950s, we now know that electrons and protons from the sun are blown towards the earth on the "solar wind".

The temperature above the surface of the sun is millions of degrees Celsius. At this temperature, collisions between gas molecules are frequent and explosive. Free electrons and protons are thrown from the sun's atmosphere by the rotation of the sun and escape through holes in the magnetic field. Blown towards the earth by the solar wind, the charged particles are largely deflected by the earth's magnetic field. However, the earth's magnetic field is weaker at either pole and therefore some particles enter the earth's atmosphere and collide with gas particles. These collisions emit light that we perceive as the dancing lights of the north (and the south).

The lights of the Aurora generally extend from 80 kilometers (50 miles) to as high as 640 kilometers (400 miles) above the earth's surface.

Where to watch?

Northern Lights can be seen in the northern or southern hemisphere, in an irregularly shaped oval centered over each magnetic pole. The lights are known as "Aurora borealis" in the north and "Aurora australis" in the south. Scientists have learned that in most instances northern and southern auroras are mirror-like images that occur at the same time, with similar shapes and colors.

Because the phenomena occurs near the magnetic poles, northern lights have been seen as far south as New Orleans in the western hemisphere, while similar locations in the east never experience the mysterious lights. However, the best places to watch the lights (in North America) are in the northwestern parts of Canada, particularly the Yukon, Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Alaska. Auroral displays can also be seen over the southern tip of Greenland and Iceland, the northern coast of Norway and over the coastal waters north of Siberia. Southern auroras are not often seen as they are concentrated in a ring around Antarctica and the southern Indian Ocean.

Areas that are not subject to "light pollution" are the best places to watch for the lights. Areas in the north, in smaller communities, tend to be best.

When to watch?

Researchers have also discovered that auroral activity is cyclic, peaking roughly every 11 years. The next peak period is 2024. 

Winter in the north is generally a good season to view lights. The long periods of darkness and the frequency of clear nights provide many good opportunities to watch the auroral displays. Usually, the best time of night (on clear nights) to watch for auroral displays is local midnight.

Legend Of The Lights

"Aurora borealis", the lights of the northern hemisphere, means "dawn of the north". "Aurora australis" means "dawn of the south". In Roman myths, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn. Many cultural groups have legends about the lights. In medieval times, the occurrences of auroral displays were seen as harbingers of war or famine. The Maori of New Zealand shared a belief with many northern people of Europe and North America that the lights were reflections from torches or campfires.

The Menominee Indians of Wisconsin believed that the lights indicated the location of manabai'wok (giants) who were the spirits of great hunters and fishermen. The Inuit of Alaska believed that the lights were the spirits of the animals they hunted: the seals, salmon, deer and beluga whales. Other aboriginal peoples believed that the lights were the spirits of their people.

Nights to remember - Have you ever seen northern lights? The most amazing experience I had with them was in Reykjavik 2016. The Aurora forecast predicted a solid 9 out of 10 likelihood for northern lights to appear and the city even turned off all street lights for an hour, so that they were more visible. It was simply amazing, they were so clear and colourful and it felt like they were right above my head and I could grab them. Unfortunately I don't have a picture of that night, but the northern lights in my photo from Reykjanes coast gets quite close.
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Shot on sonyalpha  7III #iceland #icelandphotography #icelandnature #icelandtrip #icelandtravel #secreticeland #discovericeland #exploreiceland #icelandcapture #iceland_photography #northernlights #northernlightsiceland #reykjavik #whatsonrvk #reykjanes #seascapephotography #lostiniceland #wheniniceland #nightsky #magicsky #beyondthelands #beatifuldestinations
Forget the virus for a second and If you could travel to one place right now where would it be and why ?
I’d probably got to to California and roam up and down their coastline, visit places like the big sur and malibu. Why ? Because I haven’t been before and its a coast lovers dream!
After a long time, there's a northern lights picture again!
.
If you like this kind of pictures, you can follow natures_purest_beauty , there will be a lot more posts like this one!
.
Pic from northernlightspictures 
.
.
.
.
#northernlights #northernlightsphotos #northernlightsiceland #northernlightsranch #northernlightsnorway #northernlightsvillage #northernlightsalaska #northernlightscanada #northernlightswildlifesociety #northernlightsfinland #northernlightstraveller #northernlightspainting #northernlightstour #northernlightspalette #auroraborealis #aurora #norway #raw #travel #nightsky #travelphotography #naturephotography #iceland #finland #sky #lapland #snow #arctic #auroraboreal
Wanna live here??? 

Photograph by ccseyes .

#house#home#peace#lake
#northernlightsiceland
#nightphotography #northernlightsphotos #northeraurora 
#natureshots #beautifulldestination 
#amazingphotohunter #pleasantplace 
#northernnature #northcarolina
I have no words for this beauty ✨
.
Bei soviel Schönheit fehlen mir wirklich die Worte...
Das war vielleicht eine Nacht. Als wir aus unserer kleinen, gemütlichen Blockhütte eilten, weil wir die Polarlichter drinnen durchs Fenster erkennen konnten, musste ich leider feststellen, dass ich die Kamerahalterung für mein Stativ am Vortag irgendwo verloren haben musste. Das tat weh! Seit Jahren träumte ich davon Polarlichter zu fotografieren. Bisher hatte ich aber nie das Glück gehabt welche sehen zu können; irgendetwas an den Konditionen passte in der Vergangenheit einfach nie. Und nun, da sie so deutlich an einem sternenklaren Himmel über uns flimmerten, drohte mein Traum wieder zu scheitern, weil mir das Arbeitsgerät fehlte. Es ohne Stativ zu versuchen, sinnlos. Die Bilder werden dann einfach nur unscharf. Fast hätte es also nicht geklappt... aber:
Danke an dieser Stelle an fabi.the.huebbi fürs Teilen deines Stativs mit mir. Traum Polarlicht gerettet! 😘
#auroraborealis #iceland #longexposure
.
.
.
.
#aurora #polarlichter #northernlights #northernlightsphotos #polarlights #polarlicht #northernlightsiceland #wheniniceland #inspiredbyiceland #inlovewithiceland #guidetoiceland #exploreiceland #mystopover #travelblogger #wanderfolk #thegreatoutdoors #outdoorfolk #letsgosomewhere #visualsofearth #milliondollarvisuals #eclectic_shotz #depthsofearth #earthpix #agameoftones #theimaged

Nights to remember - Have you ever seen northern lights? The most amazing experience I had with them was in Reykjavik 2016. The Aurora forecast predicted a solid 9 out of 10 likelihood for northern lights to appear and the city even turned off all street lights for an hour, so that they were more visible. It was simply amazing, they were so clear and colourful and it felt like they were right above my head and I could grab them. Unfortunately I don't have a picture of that night, but the northern lights in my photo from Reykjanes coast gets quite close.
.
.
Shot on sonyalpha  7III #iceland #icelandphotography #icelandnature #icelandtrip #icelandtravel #secreticeland #discovericeland #exploreiceland #icelandcapture #iceland_photography #northernlights #northernlightsiceland #reykjavik #whatsonrvk #reykjanes #seascapephotography #lostiniceland #wheniniceland #nightsky #magicsky #beyondthelands #beatifuldestinations
Forget the virus for a second and If you could travel to one place right now where would it be and why ?
I’d probably got to to California and roam up and down their coastline, visit places like the big sur and malibu. Why ? Because I haven’t been before and its a coast lovers dream!
After a long time, there's a northern lights picture again!
.
If you like this kind of pictures, you can follow natures_purest_beauty , there will be a lot more posts like this one!
.
Pic from northernlightspictures 
.
.
.
.
#northernlights #northernlightsphotos #northernlightsiceland #northernlightsranch #northernlightsnorway #northernlightsvillage #northernlightsalaska #northernlightscanada #northernlightswildlifesociety #northernlightsfinland #northernlightstraveller #northernlightspainting #northernlightstour #northernlightspalette #auroraborealis #aurora #norway #raw #travel #nightsky #travelphotography #naturephotography #iceland #finland #sky #lapland #snow #arctic #auroraboreal
Wanna live here??? 

Photograph by ccseyes .

#house#home#peace#lake
#northernlightsiceland
#nightphotography #northernlightsphotos #northeraurora 
#natureshots #beautifulldestination 
#amazingphotohunter #pleasantplace 
#northernnature #northcarolina
I have no words for this beauty ✨
.
Bei soviel Schönheit fehlen mir wirklich die Worte...
Das war vielleicht eine Nacht. Als wir aus unserer kleinen, gemütlichen Blockhütte eilten, weil wir die Polarlichter drinnen durchs Fenster erkennen konnten, musste ich leider feststellen, dass ich die Kamerahalterung für mein Stativ am Vortag irgendwo verloren haben musste. Das tat weh! Seit Jahren träumte ich davon Polarlichter zu fotografieren. Bisher hatte ich aber nie das Glück gehabt welche sehen zu können; irgendetwas an den Konditionen passte in der Vergangenheit einfach nie. Und nun, da sie so deutlich an einem sternenklaren Himmel über uns flimmerten, drohte mein Traum wieder zu scheitern, weil mir das Arbeitsgerät fehlte. Es ohne Stativ zu versuchen, sinnlos. Die Bilder werden dann einfach nur unscharf. Fast hätte es also nicht geklappt... aber:
Danke an dieser Stelle an fabi.the.huebbi fürs Teilen deines Stativs mit mir. Traum Polarlicht gerettet! 😘
#auroraborealis #iceland #longexposure
.
.
.
.
#aurora #polarlichter #northernlights #northernlightsphotos #polarlights #polarlicht #northernlightsiceland #wheniniceland #inspiredbyiceland #inlovewithiceland #guidetoiceland #exploreiceland #mystopover #travelblogger #wanderfolk #thegreatoutdoors #outdoorfolk #letsgosomewhere #visualsofearth #milliondollarvisuals #eclectic_shotz #depthsofearth #earthpix #agameoftones #theimaged

Duration
• Hourly based service.
Price
Taxi for 1 - 4 people
• Hourly Rate = 10.000 ISK

Taxi for 5 - 8 people
• Hourly Rate = 13.000 ISK
Included
• English speaking driving guide.
• Taxi Vehicle, Fuel, Road & Parking fees.
Not Included
• Admission Tickets to Museums, Bathing Areas & Activity Tours.
Payment & Cancellation
• You pay at the end of the tour (Cash or Credit).
• You can cancel whenever and without cost.

Tour Details

The ideal location for sightings varies and excursion leaders are skilled in "hunting" the lights, finding locations where conditions are best for seeing them on any given night.

There are no guarantees that you will see the Northern Lights during your stay, but in most cases, sightings are immediately improved outside populated areas, especially away from the light-pollution of the capital. A number of hotels in the country side offer special Northern Lights wake-up service.

First thing first, clear skies. If the weather cooperates, you are already half-way there. You can always check weather conditions, cloud coverage and Aurora activity on the Icelandic Met Office Website.

Camera & Settings

As far as equipment goes, the most important thing you can bring is a tripod to avoid the dreaded shaken photo syndrome. If you don’t have a cable release, set your camera’s self-timer to two or ten seconds shutter delay, if available.

There is no single setting for your camera that ensures great captures, but if you have manual options, you are probably best served with experimenting with various combinations of ISO, aperture, and exposure settings. As a rule of thumb, ISO setting between 800 and 3200, aperture between f/2.8 and f/5.6, and shutter speed at between 15 seconds and 30 seconds have proven effective.

Different combinations may give very different results. Higher ISO setting will allow you to capture faster exposures, but may also result in grainier images, for examples. Note that shutter speeds of above 15 seconds will result in slight star movement. Wider angle lenses are usually more versatile in low light settings, but longer lenses give you different options for compositions. Make sure that you remove all lens filters, as they may distort images. You will probably get the best results with manual setting for infinite focal length

What are they?

When lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. They are known as "Aurora borealis" in the north and "Aurora australis" in the south. 

Auroral displays appear in many colors although pale green and pink are the most common. Shades of red, yellow, green, blue, and violet have been reported. The lights appear in many forms from patches or scattered clouds of light to streamers, arcs, rippling curtains or shooting rays that light up the sky with an eerie glow.

What is the cause?

The Northern Lights are actually the result of collisions between gaseous particles in the Earth's atmosphere with charged particles released from the sun's atmosphere. Colour variations are due to the type of gas particles that are colliding. The most common auroral color, a pale yellowish-green, is produced by oxygen molecules located about 60 miles above the earth. Rare, all-red auroras are produced by high-altitude oxygen, at heights of up to 200 miles. Nitrogen produces blue or purplish-red aurora.

The connection between the Northern Lights and sunspot activity has been suspected since about 1880. Thanks to research conducted since the 1950s, we now know that electrons and protons from the sun are blown towards the earth on the "solar wind".

The temperature above the surface of the sun is millions of degrees Celsius. At this temperature, collisions between gas molecules are frequent and explosive. Free electrons and protons are thrown from the sun's atmosphere by the rotation of the sun and escape through holes in the magnetic field. Blown towards the earth by the solar wind, the charged particles are largely deflected by the earth's magnetic field. However, the earth's magnetic field is weaker at either pole and therefore some particles enter the earth's atmosphere and collide with gas particles. These collisions emit light that we perceive as the dancing lights of the north (and the south).

The lights of the Aurora generally extend from 80 kilometers (50 miles) to as high as 640 kilometers (400 miles) above the earth's surface.

Where to watch?

Northern Lights can be seen in the northern or southern hemisphere, in an irregularly shaped oval centered over each magnetic pole. The lights are known as "Aurora borealis" in the north and "Aurora australis" in the south. Scientists have learned that in most instances northern and southern auroras are mirror-like images that occur at the same time, with similar shapes and colors.

Because the phenomena occurs near the magnetic poles, northern lights have been seen as far south as New Orleans in the western hemisphere, while similar locations in the east never experience the mysterious lights. However, the best places to watch the lights (in North America) are in the northwestern parts of Canada, particularly the Yukon, Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Alaska. Auroral displays can also be seen over the southern tip of Greenland and Iceland, the northern coast of Norway and over the coastal waters north of Siberia. Southern auroras are not often seen as they are concentrated in a ring around Antarctica and the southern Indian Ocean.

Areas that are not subject to "light pollution" are the best places to watch for the lights. Areas in the north, in smaller communities, tend to be best.

When to watch?

Researchers have also discovered that auroral activity is cyclic, peaking roughly every 11 years. The next peak period is 2024. 

Winter in the north is generally a good season to view lights. The long periods of darkness and the frequency of clear nights provide many good opportunities to watch the auroral displays. Usually, the best time of night (on clear nights) to watch for auroral displays is local midnight.

Legend Of The Lights

"Aurora borealis", the lights of the northern hemisphere, means "dawn of the north". "Aurora australis" means "dawn of the south". In Roman myths, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn. Many cultural groups have legends about the lights. In medieval times, the occurrences of auroral displays were seen as harbingers of war or famine. The Maori of New Zealand shared a belief with many northern people of Europe and North America that the lights were reflections from torches or campfires.

The Menominee Indians of Wisconsin believed that the lights indicated the location of manabai'wok (giants) who were the spirits of great hunters and fishermen. The Inuit of Alaska believed that the lights were the spirits of the animals they hunted: the seals, salmon, deer and beluga whales. Other aboriginal peoples believed that the lights were the spirits of their people.