Reykjavik City Tour

Duration
• Hourly based service.
Price
Taxi for 1 - 3 people
• Hourly Rate = 9.600 ISK

Taxi for 4 - 6 people
• Hourly Rate = 12.500 ISK
Included
• English speaking driving guide.
• Taxi Vehicle, Fuel, Road & Parking fees.
Not Included
• Admission Tickets to Museums, Bathing Areas & Activity Tours.
Payment & Cancellation
• You pay at the end of the tour (Cash or Credit).
• You can cancel whenever and without cost.

Tour Details
This tour will take you to see some of the main attractions in Reykjavík, all depending on your Interest, Time, and Budget. Here below you can read about some of the popular sites in Reykjavík.

If you are in Reykjavik for Business, then you could also use this service to drive you around between meetings.

Tour Highlights

Hallgrímskirkja Church
Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran parish church in Reykjavík. At 74.5 meters (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in the country. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

The church is one of the city's best-known landmarks and is visible throughout the city. State Architect Guðjón Samúelsson's design of the church was commissioned in 1937. He is said to have designed it to resemble the trap-rocks, mountains, and glaciers of Iceland's landscape.

Because of the Great Depression, It took more than 40 years to finish the construction of the church. Construction started in 1945 and ended in 1986.

Skólavörðustígur Street
Skólavörðustígur is a street that leads from the main shopping street (Laugavegur) to the top of the hill to Hallgrímskirkja. Skólavörðustígur is today best know for its coffee houses, Art Galleries, Souvenir Shops, and the amazing view towards Hallgrímskirkja Church.

The Penalty House
Hegningarhúsið (The Penalty House) at Skólavörðustígur 9, was a prison run by the Icelandic Prison Service. Built-in 1872, it was the oldest prison in Iceland. All operations in Hegningarhúsið ceased on June 1st, 2016.

The origins of the Icelandic phrase "fara í steininn" (going to the stone) is purportedly due to the stone interiors of this prison.

It was last used as a reception prison, where prisoners stayed for a short period of time, fx. at the beginning of serving a sentence.

Laugavegur Street
Laugavegur is one of the oldest shopping streets in Iceland. The name means "wash road", as it used to lead from the city center to the hot springs in Laugardalur where in olden times the women of Reykjavík took their laundry for washing.

Today the main shopping area starts at Hlemmur Squire and goes all the way to the main city center.

It is also home to many bars, nightclubs, and restaurants. On Friday and Saturday nights, the street is often filled with people all night long.

The Cabinet House
The Cabinet House (Stjórnarráðið) has carried a few names since it was built as a prison during the period 1765-70.

The original idea was to accommodate vagabonds who were fit enough and able to work for the pioneer woolen industries of the country. The governor of Iceland at the time, Skuli Magnusson, was an ideologist, who wanted to create employment possibilities for the agricultural population of the country by building those factories. He managed to see his dream come true, but workers were hard to come by.

The Danish government of Iceland at the time, however, decided that the house should serve as a prison, which it did until 1816. It probably stood empty for three years, until the Danish governor, count Moltke, arrived and found his lodgings uninhabitable and his office space unusable. He managed to have the government fund the reconstruction of the house and moved in with his family and officials.

In 1874, the Icelanders celebrated the Millenium of the inhabitancy of the country, and the Danish king, Christian IX, participated. He also brought along the country’s first constitution and handed it over in the ancient Parliamentary Plains (Thingvellir).

In 1904, Iceland was granted home rule by the Danish government. This announcement was read publicly on the steps of the Cabinet House and the official flag of the country was hoisted in front of it for the first time. Consequently, the house was occupied by the three ministers of the Icelandic government and got its present name.

Today the house is occupied by the offices of the prime minister.

The statues in front of the house are the work of the sculptor, Einar Jonsson, from the years 1915 and 1931. One depicts King Christian IX handing over the constitution in 1874, and the other Hannes Hafstein, who became the first minister of the country in 1904.

Sun Voyager
The Sun Voyager (Sólfari) is a sculpture from August 18th, 1990, by Jón Gunnar Árnason, located next to the Sæbraut road in Reykjavík, Iceland. Sun Voyager is described as a dreamboat or an ode to the Sun. The artist intended it to convey the promise of undiscovered territory, a dream of hope, progress, and freedom.

The work is constructed of quality stainless steel and stands on a circle of granite slabs surrounded by so-called “town-hall concrete”. It was constructed in accordance with Jón Gunnar's enlarged full-scale drawing of Sun Voyager and was overseen by Jón Gunnar's assistant, the artist Kristinn E. Hrafnsson. The engineering of the sculpture was supervised by the technologist, Sigurjón Yngvason, in close cooperation with Jón Gunnar himself, the building itself was carried out by Reynir Hjálmtýsson and his assistant.

Harpa Concert Hall
Harpa is one of Reykjavik‘s greatest and distinguished landmarks. It is a cultural and social center in the heart of the city and features stunning views of the surrounding mountains and the North Atlantic Ocean. Harpa is an enchanting destination for intrigued travelers and its grand-scale award-winning architecture has attracted 7 million guests since its opening, May 4th, 2011.

Harpa Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre offers the best facilities for concerts and conferences in Northern Europe. Harpa has received numerous awards and prizes. Harpa was chosen one of the best concert halls of the new millennium by the prestigious music magazine Gramophone magazine and was chosen as the best performance venue in 2011 by Travel & Leisure magazine. In Autumn 2012 Harpa received the prestigious award as the Best MICE Centre in Northern Europe.

Lutheran Cathedral
Around the turn of the 18th century, the episcopate seat Skalholt was moved to the capital and the whole country became one diocese. Before these changes took place it was considered necessary to build a cathedral (Dómkirkjan) in Reykjavik. In 1788 stones were heaped upon the building site during the winter to ensure sufficient building material for the summer. A group of handicraftsmen came from Denmark, but the proceedings were slow because of their drunkenness.

The roof of the church was so badly constructed, that it had to be rebuilt in 1792. Despite these delays, the church was completed and consecrated in 1796, exactly 10 years after the capital had received its municipal rights, and the church could seat most of its inhabitants. The building leaked and was so damp, that people kept away. It was discovered, that most of the wood used for the construction had been rotten from the beginning.

In 1815 the church was condemned by the municipal authorities and two years later it was thoroughly restored. On Whitsunday 1825 one of the roof beams squeaked so much, that the congregation was driven mad with fear and escaped through doors and windows. The baptismal font, made by the sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen, was put up in the church in 1839, and the next year it acquired an organ. The church was reconstructed and enlarged in 1847-1848 and the sand for the masonry was imported from Denmark as if there were no sand to be found in Iceland.

The Danish architect L.A.Winstrup and Danish handicraftsmen were employed for this task and during the next few decades, the church fell into disrepair because of lack of maintenance. This called for a thorough restoration in 1879 by an Icelandic carpenter, who left the church looking like it does today with seats for 600 people. The National Library, The National Museum, and the National Archives were housed in the loft of the church until they were moved to the House of Parliament in 1881. The latest restoration took place in 1999. The architecture of the cathedral is neoclassic.

The House of Parliament
The House of Parliament (Alþingishúsið) was built in 1880 – 1881. It was constructed from hewn blocks of the gray basaltic rock (dolerite) upon which a part of the capital rests. The architect was the Dane F. Meldahl, the director of The Academy of Art in Copenhagen and the Danish mason Bald. The first assembly of the parliament in the new building took place on July 1st, 1881.

The National Library, The National Archives, and the National Museum were housed there for a while until the museum building was ready. The University was housed there from its establishment in 1911 to 1940 when its main building was ready. The Danish governor’s office was there between 1941 and 1944 when the Icelanders proclaimed the republic in the Parliamentary Plains in 1944. The garden behind the building was named after one of the members of Parliament, prime minister and a renowned entrepreneur, Tryggvi Gunnarsson, who lies buried there.

The Pond
Tjörnin is a small, prominent lake in central Reykjavík. Most visitors to the city pass along its shore, as it is situated in the city center next to the Reykjavik City Hall and several museums. Tjörnin means "the lake" or "the pond". Feeding the birds on the lake shores is a popular pastime, so much that it has been referred to as "the biggest bread soup in the world".

Reykjavík City Hall
The idea of a city hall in Reykjavik is almost as old as the city itself. For years the municipal authorities explored the possibility of building a city hall, studied locations, and invited proposals for its design.

It was not until 1987, however, on the initiation of mayor David Oddsson, that the city council decided to build the Reykjavik City Hall on the northern shore of Lake Tjornin, after inviting designs with a competition.

Reykjavik City Hall was completed and inaugurated on April 14th, 1992, a beautiful testimony to the vision of its creators. Within it, city residents and city council officials have a venue to meet and exchange ideas about the future of Iceland’s capital, to enjoy artistic and cultural events, and last but not least, to delight in the unique setting.

The oldest house in Reykjavik
The historic house, Aðalstræti 10 in Reykjavík, was opened to the public by Mayor Dagur B. Eggertsson on Saturday, May 5th, 2018. The house now belongs to Reykjavík City Museum and will be run as an exhibition space. Aðalstræti 10, built-in 1762, is the oldest and one of the city's most important houses, in the heart of the city center. The history of the house and the city of Reykjavík are closely connected. At the time when the house was built, Reykjavík had very few inhabitants and had just started to resemble a village. 140 years later, Reykjavík became the capital of the country. In the back house of Aðalstræti 10, there are two exhibitions called Reykjavík 1918 and A Town of Turf Houses.

Reykjavik Old Harbor
The so-called Old Harbor of Reykjavik is the first lasting harbor of the town. It was constructed between 1913 and 1917 on the cove Reykjavik, after which the farm of the first settler and later the town were named.

In 1911 the town council agreed to construct the harbor, based on the plans of the harbormaster of Kristiania (now Oslo) from 1909. The Danish engineer N.C. Monbergs’ offer for the construction was accepted and the work started in 1913.

Two locomotives were used to transport the building materials from the hills Skolavorduholt and Oskjuhlid to the construction site. The progress was rather quick and the first ship was docked in 1915. increased during the next decades and landfills increased the space by the harbor.

Continuous improvements and landfills have taken place on the spit Orfirisey, where various firms have built their headquarters. In 1960 the town council agreed on a long breakwater between Örfirisey and the island Engey, but this project was not realized. Instead, ideas about freight harbors in the Island Videy Area were accepted and the cement (gravel and asphalt) and Vatnagardar harbors were finished in 1968 and the Holtabakki harbor in 1980-81. The marina was finished in 2003.

The Catholic Church
The first Catholic priests to arrive in Iceland after the Reformation were the Frenchmen Bernard Bernard and Jean-Baptiste Baudoin. They bought the Landakot farmstead in Reykjavík and settled there in the early 19th century. They built a small chapel in 1864. A few years later, a small wooden church was erected by Túngata, close to Landakot. After the First World War, Icelandic Catholics saw the need to build a bigger church for the growing number of Catholics. They decided to build a Neo-Gothic church and entrusted the task to the architect Guðjón Samúelsson. After years of construction, Landakotskirkja was finally sanctified on July 23rd, 1929. It was the largest church in Iceland at the time. Today, Landakotskirkja is a distinct landmark in western Reykjavík.

Grótta Island
The island is connected to the mainland by an isthmus, which is flooded during high tides, and many people walk across at low tides to enjoy the variety of the birdlife and an occasional seal nearby. The land has been and still is subsiding rather quickly and those who have lived in the community for a long time have witnessed the gradual advance of the sea. Near the island is a popular golf course and a beacon for one of the runways of the Reykjavik Airport.

In earlier times a farm occupied the island and the lighthouse standing there was built in 1897. It was restored thoroughly in 1947 and has been maintained well since then. There were fishing outfits on the island as well, when the fisheries were based on open rowing boats.

The National Museum
The National Museum of Iceland (Þjóðminjasafn Íslands) was established on February 24th, 1863, with Jón Árnason the first curator of the Icelandic collection. Previously the items were kept in Danish museums. The second curator, Sigurður Guðmundsson, advocated the creation of an antiquarian collection, and the museum was called the Antiquarian Collection until 1911.

Before settling at its present location in 1950, it was housed in various Reykjavík attics, finally for forty years in the attic of the National Library building on Hverfisgata (Safnahúsið, now the Culture House, Þjóðmenningarhúsið).

A key object in the permanent exhibition is the Valþjófsstaður door, a celebrated carving depicting a version of the Lion-Knight legend where a knight slays a dragon, thus freeing a lion that becomes his companion.

The Pearl
The Pearl (Perlan) is a prominent landmark in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavík. It is situated on the top of Öskjuhlíð hill. What was originally a cluster of hot water tanks was in 1991 converted to a building open to the public. It hosts an exhibition, a planetarium, an observation deck, and a restaurant.

Perlan was designed by architect Ingimundur Sveinsson and opened to the public on June 21st, 1991. The building is composed of an immense glass dome that sits on six hot-water tanks, each carrying 4 million liters of geothermal hot water. All of this is supported by a colossal steel frame, which serves important functions in addition to holding everything together. The framework, hollow on the inside, is actually a gigantic radiator. In the winter when it is cold, hot water runs through the frame, while cold water is used in the summertime.

Reykjavik City Zoo
The decision to build the zoo in Laugardalur Valley was taken by the Reykjavík City Council on April 22nd, 1986. The goal with its establishment was to educate the general public on Icelandic farm animals, give them a closer look at Icelandic farming practices, and strengthen the bond between people and animals. The construction of the zoo began in 1989. Within one year, six structures for animal keeping were built, a seal pond was dug, areas for foxes, minks, and reindeer formed and a goat enclosure set up. In addition to that, the workshop Hafrafell, which painter Örlygur Sigurson owned, was converted into an office and lecture hall. Plans were put in place to keep more than 20 species while letting the animals that live in Iceland have the spotlight, including farm animals and those found in the wild. There are few animals of each type. Efforts are made to display their variations, colors, both sexes, and their offspring. The zoo was opened by then-mayor Davíð Oddson on May 19th, 1990.

Reykjavík Botanic Garden
Reykjavík Botanic Garden (Grasagarðurinn) is a botanical garden located in the district of Laugardalur in Reykjavík that was established on August 18th, 1961 on the 175th anniversary of the city.

The garden currently conserves more than 5,000 plant species in eight plant collections and offers prosperous birdlife, particularly grey geese. One of the many purposes of the institution is education, with guided tours being provided to the public and school groups annually visiting the park. The park is a member of the Botanic Gardens Conservation International organization with the code REYK.

The house at Höfði
Höfði is a house in Reykjavík, Iceland, best known as the location for the 1986 Reykjavík Summit meeting of President Ronald Reagan of the United States and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev of the Soviet Union. That effectively was a step to the end of the Cold War. Within the building, the flags of the United States and the Soviet Union are cross-hung to commemorate the meeting.

The house was built in 1909 and is located at Félagstún. It was initially built for the French Consul and was the exclusive residence of poet and businessman Einar Benediktsson for twelve years (1913-1925). From 1925 to 1937 painter Louisa Matthíasdóttir's family owned the house and resided there.

In the 1940s and 1950s, it was home to the British Embassy in Reykjavík. The city of Reykjavík purchased the house in 1958 and restored it. From then on it has been used for formal receptions and festive occasions.

Open Air Museum in Árbær
This museum is a part of the Municipal History Museum. Its main function is to bring into perspective the way of living, the working conditions and pastime of the people of Reykjavik in the past. The museum also keeps and registers old houses, relics, and antiquities. In 1957 the town council decided to open a park with a collection of old houses of cultural value for the capital. The museum was opened the same summer.

Most of the houses on the museum grounds were removed from the old centre of Reykjavik and their number is constantly growing. They are quite interesting, both outside and inside.

Reykjavík Swimming Pools
Reykjavík City runs seven public thermal pools (sundlaugar) which are heated with geothermal water and are part of the city's policy of encouraging public sports and a healthy lifestyle. The pools offer steam baths, saunas, hot tubs, and jacuzzis. Much is done to ensure the safety of guests and all staff receive regular training and instructions on safety-related issues.

Most of the swimming pools are outdoors. They are open all year round and offer a unique spa-like experience. The pools are heated to about 28° and have several hot tubs to choose from, at various temperatures, ranging from 38°C up to around 45°C. Most thermal baths have steam rooms, and some also have a dry Finnish sauna and cold water tubs to cool down after exercise and saunas.

The Residence of the President
Bessastaðir is today the official residence of the President of Iceland and is situated in Álftanes, not far from the capital city, Reykjavík.

Bessastaðir was first settled in 1000. It became one of Snorri Sturluson's farms in the 13th century. After Snorri's murder in September 1241, Bessastaðir was claimed by the King of Norway. Thereafter it became a Royal stronghold and the dwellings of the King's highest-ranking officers and officials in Iceland. It resisted an attack by Turkish slave raiders in July 1627. In the late 18th century Bessastaðir was changed into a school for a few years, before becoming a farm. In 1867 the farm was purchased by the poet and statesman Grímur Thomsen, who lived there for almost two decades. Among later owners were editor and parliamentarian Skúli Thoroddsen, and his wife, Theodóra Thoroddsen, who was well known for her literary works. In 1940 Sigurður Jónasson bought Bessastaðir and donated it to the state in 1941 as a residence for the Regent and later the President of Iceland.

Beautiful aurora boreals over the Hallgrimskirkja in Reykjavik.

Photo by: svanurgabriele
From a trip a long long time ago. The Sólfar, or Sun Voyager sculpture, March 2013.
//
#sólfar #sunvoyager #sculpture #reykjavík #dawn #pinkskies #earthfocus #icelandtravel #wheniniceland #exploreiceland #icelandophile #iceland #everydayiceland #naturelovers #canon5dmarkiii #traveltheworld #neverstopexploring #wanderlust #adventure
Un peu de couleur et de gaieté en cette veille de rentrée ! 🌈 ⁣
⁣
Et oui, c’est fini les vacances pour nous, demain c’est le retour au Lycée pour une nouvelle année ! En tous cas cette année sera forcément meilleure que la dernière puisque nous travaillons de nouveau ensemble 🥰⁣
⁣
Cette photo pleine de couleurs n’est plus à présenter tant elle est touristique ! Nous sommes donc ici à Reykjavik, capitale de l’Islande et plus précisément au bout de la rue où se trouve l’imposante église Hallgrímskirkja.⁣
⁣
Celle-ci a été construite en 1945 pour être terminée seulement en 1986 faute de moyens financiers. Haute de 73 mètres, c’est la plus grande et la plus haute église du pays ! L’architecte a souhaité rappeler les orgues basaltiques, formation rocheuse que l’on trouve un peu partout dans le pays (cf notre photo au Studlagil Canyon).⁣
⁣
Afin d’avoir cette magnifique vue sur l’église, il faut prendre la rue Skólavörðustígurquk qui descend au pied de celle-ci ! Cette rue, ainsi que la rue perpendiculaire Laugavegur sont des rues piétonnes très chaleureuses et colorées que nous vous conseillons de prendre lors de votre visite de la capitale Islandaise ! 🌈⁣
⁣
Et vous, avez-vous déjà repris le travail ? 👨🏼‍💻👩🏼‍💻⁣
⁣
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -⁣
Islande, Août 2020 🇮🇸⁣
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -⁣
⁣
#church #Hallgrímskirkja #Hallgrimskirkja ⁣
#Hallgrimskirkjachurch #churcharchitecture #churchisland #icelandchurch #laugavegur #streetart #reykjavik #downtownreykjavik #reykjavikloves #discovericeland #guidetoiceland #visitreykjavik #exploreiceland #streetphotography #reykjavík #rainbowstreet #rainbow  #icelandtravel #reykjavikcity #icelandtrip #visiticeland #icelandroadtrip #islande #iceland
Zurück aus Island und den Sturm und ein paar Fotos im Gepäck. Durch den Wind verursachte schneidende Kälte hielten mich nicht ab ein paar Eindrücke zu verewigen. Ich liebe meinen Beruf und die Kamera ist immer dabei!
Sunvoyager Reykjavik
Matena Moments / Fotografie

#iceland #reykjavik #sunvoyager #sunsetphotography #greenland #voyage #monument #vikings #wikinger #traveltheworld #visiticeland #explore #winterwonderland #boat #landscape #skylovers #adventuretime #harbour #oceanview
Hallgrímskirkja, the iconic Icelandic church 🇮🇸🖤🇮🇸⛪️

*
*
*
*
Welcome to back to my series from Iceland! 🇮🇸 This time I will share “Pretty Icelandic Churches “ with you! ♥️🇮🇸💙 The fourth church is located in downtown of Reykjavík.  Hallgrímskirkja is Iceland’s biggest church, towering over downtown Reykjavík. The facade of this Lutheran church is inspired by basalt columns found in Icelandic nature. Building of Hallgrímskirkja was completed in 1986. 
*
*
*
*
*
Have you guys already seen this iconic church ? 🖤⛪️
*
*
*
*
Photo/Location Tip🙋🏻‍♀️📷: This is the most iconic landmark in Reykjavík! Hallgrímskirkja is open every day from 09:00 till 17:00. You can also visit the tower, which has some epic views of Reykjavík ! 
*
*
*
*

#reykjavik #reykjavík #reykjavikiceland #iceland🇮🇸 #icelandroadtrip #icelandnature *
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
#traveholic#passionpassport#viewsfordays#icelandic #icelandscape #dametraveler#sheisnotlost#iceland_photography #wearetravelgirls#icelandadventure #hallgrímskirkja #icelandexplored #reykjavikloves #icelandlove #mytraveldiary#hallgrimskirkja #icelandtravels #icelandadvice #passportlife#icelanders #addictedtotravel#gameofthroneslocation #travelgirls #damestravel
Talk about amazing sunsets that last hours!!! This particular evening was one of the prettiest I have ever seen and this is not edited to add vibrance or saturation. Truly magical. .
.
.
.
#visiticeland #sunvoyagericeland #icelandtravel #icelandscape #icelandic #aroundiceland #loves_iceland #icelandsecret #icelandroadtrip  #Icelandtravel #roadtrip #sunvoyager #everydayiceland #icelandicadventure  #whyiceland  #icelandic #iceland_photography #icelandtrip #worldtravellers #travelpassport #sunset 
#sunsets #sunsetskies #sunset_pics #icelandscenery #sunsetlover

Beautiful aurora boreals over the Hallgrimskirkja in Reykjavik.

Photo by: svanurgabriele
From a trip a long long time ago. The Sólfar, or Sun Voyager sculpture, March 2013.
//
#sólfar #sunvoyager #sculpture #reykjavík #dawn #pinkskies #earthfocus #icelandtravel #wheniniceland #exploreiceland #icelandophile #iceland #everydayiceland #naturelovers #canon5dmarkiii #traveltheworld #neverstopexploring #wanderlust #adventure
Un peu de couleur et de gaieté en cette veille de rentrée ! 🌈 ⁣
⁣
Et oui, c’est fini les vacances pour nous, demain c’est le retour au Lycée pour une nouvelle année ! En tous cas cette année sera forcément meilleure que la dernière puisque nous travaillons de nouveau ensemble 🥰⁣
⁣
Cette photo pleine de couleurs n’est plus à présenter tant elle est touristique ! Nous sommes donc ici à Reykjavik, capitale de l’Islande et plus précisément au bout de la rue où se trouve l’imposante église Hallgrímskirkja.⁣
⁣
Celle-ci a été construite en 1945 pour être terminée seulement en 1986 faute de moyens financiers. Haute de 73 mètres, c’est la plus grande et la plus haute église du pays ! L’architecte a souhaité rappeler les orgues basaltiques, formation rocheuse que l’on trouve un peu partout dans le pays (cf notre photo au Studlagil Canyon).⁣
⁣
Afin d’avoir cette magnifique vue sur l’église, il faut prendre la rue Skólavörðustígurquk qui descend au pied de celle-ci ! Cette rue, ainsi que la rue perpendiculaire Laugavegur sont des rues piétonnes très chaleureuses et colorées que nous vous conseillons de prendre lors de votre visite de la capitale Islandaise ! 🌈⁣
⁣
Et vous, avez-vous déjà repris le travail ? 👨🏼‍💻👩🏼‍💻⁣
⁣
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -⁣
Islande, Août 2020 🇮🇸⁣
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -⁣
⁣
#church #Hallgrímskirkja #Hallgrimskirkja ⁣
#Hallgrimskirkjachurch #churcharchitecture #churchisland #icelandchurch #laugavegur #streetart #reykjavik #downtownreykjavik #reykjavikloves #discovericeland #guidetoiceland #visitreykjavik #exploreiceland #streetphotography #reykjavík #rainbowstreet #rainbow  #icelandtravel #reykjavikcity #icelandtrip #visiticeland #icelandroadtrip #islande #iceland
Zurück aus Island und den Sturm und ein paar Fotos im Gepäck. Durch den Wind verursachte schneidende Kälte hielten mich nicht ab ein paar Eindrücke zu verewigen. Ich liebe meinen Beruf und die Kamera ist immer dabei!
Sunvoyager Reykjavik
Matena Moments / Fotografie

#iceland #reykjavik #sunvoyager #sunsetphotography #greenland #voyage #monument #vikings #wikinger #traveltheworld #visiticeland #explore #winterwonderland #boat #landscape #skylovers #adventuretime #harbour #oceanview
Hallgrímskirkja, the iconic Icelandic church 🇮🇸🖤🇮🇸⛪️

*
*
*
*
Welcome to back to my series from Iceland! 🇮🇸 This time I will share “Pretty Icelandic Churches “ with you! ♥️🇮🇸💙 The fourth church is located in downtown of Reykjavík.  Hallgrímskirkja is Iceland’s biggest church, towering over downtown Reykjavík. The facade of this Lutheran church is inspired by basalt columns found in Icelandic nature. Building of Hallgrímskirkja was completed in 1986. 
*
*
*
*
*
Have you guys already seen this iconic church ? 🖤⛪️
*
*
*
*
Photo/Location Tip🙋🏻‍♀️📷: This is the most iconic landmark in Reykjavík! Hallgrímskirkja is open every day from 09:00 till 17:00. You can also visit the tower, which has some epic views of Reykjavík ! 
*
*
*
*

#reykjavik #reykjavík #reykjavikiceland #iceland🇮🇸 #icelandroadtrip #icelandnature *
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
#traveholic#passionpassport#viewsfordays#icelandic #icelandscape #dametraveler#sheisnotlost#iceland_photography #wearetravelgirls#icelandadventure #hallgrímskirkja #icelandexplored #reykjavikloves #icelandlove #mytraveldiary#hallgrimskirkja #icelandtravels #icelandadvice #passportlife#icelanders #addictedtotravel#gameofthroneslocation #travelgirls #damestravel
Talk about amazing sunsets that last hours!!! This particular evening was one of the prettiest I have ever seen and this is not edited to add vibrance or saturation. Truly magical. .
.
.
.
#visiticeland #sunvoyagericeland #icelandtravel #icelandscape #icelandic #aroundiceland #loves_iceland #icelandsecret #icelandroadtrip  #Icelandtravel #roadtrip #sunvoyager #everydayiceland #icelandicadventure  #whyiceland  #icelandic #iceland_photography #icelandtrip #worldtravellers #travelpassport #sunset 
#sunsets #sunsetskies #sunset_pics #icelandscenery #sunsetlover

Duration
• Hourly based service.
Price
Taxi for 1 - 3 people
• Hourly Rate = 9.600 ISK

Taxi for 4 - 6 people
• Hourly Rate = 12.500 ISK
Included
• English speaking driving guide.
• Taxi Vehicle, Fuel, Road & Parking fees.
Not Included
• Admission Tickets to Museums, Bathing Areas & Activity Tours.
Payment & Cancellation
• You pay at the end of the tour (Cash or Credit).
• You can cancel whenever and without cost.

Tour Details
This tour will take you to see some of the main attractions in Reykjavík, all depending on your Interest, Time, and Budget. Here below you can read about some of the popular sites in Reykjavík.

If you are in Reykjavik for Business, then you could also use this service to drive you around between meetings.

Tour Highlights

Hallgrímskirkja Church
Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran parish church in Reykjavík. At 74.5 meters (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in the country. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

The church is one of the city's best-known landmarks and is visible throughout the city. State Architect Guðjón Samúelsson's design of the church was commissioned in 1937. He is said to have designed it to resemble the trap-rocks, mountains, and glaciers of Iceland's landscape.

Because of the Great Depression, It took more than 40 years to finish the construction of the church. Construction started in 1945 and ended in 1986.

Skólavörðustígur Street
Skólavörðustígur is a street that leads from the main shopping street (Laugavegur) to the top of the hill to Hallgrímskirkja. Skólavörðustígur is today best know for its coffee houses, Art Galleries, Souvenir Shops, and the amazing view towards Hallgrímskirkja Church.

The Penalty House
Hegningarhúsið (The Penalty House) at Skólavörðustígur 9, was a prison run by the Icelandic Prison Service. Built-in 1872, it was the oldest prison in Iceland. All operations in Hegningarhúsið ceased on June 1st, 2016.

The origins of the Icelandic phrase "fara í steininn" (going to the stone) is purportedly due to the stone interiors of this prison.

It was last used as a reception prison, where prisoners stayed for a short period of time, fx. at the beginning of serving a sentence.

Laugavegur Street
Laugavegur is one of the oldest shopping streets in Iceland. The name means "wash road", as it used to lead from the city center to the hot springs in Laugardalur where in olden times the women of Reykjavík took their laundry for washing.

Today the main shopping area starts at Hlemmur Squire and goes all the way to the main city center.

It is also home to many bars, nightclubs, and restaurants. On Friday and Saturday nights, the street is often filled with people all night long.

The Cabinet House
The Cabinet House (Stjórnarráðið) has carried a few names since it was built as a prison during the period 1765-70.

The original idea was to accommodate vagabonds who were fit enough and able to work for the pioneer woolen industries of the country. The governor of Iceland at the time, Skuli Magnusson, was an ideologist, who wanted to create employment possibilities for the agricultural population of the country by building those factories. He managed to see his dream come true, but workers were hard to come by.

The Danish government of Iceland at the time, however, decided that the house should serve as a prison, which it did until 1816. It probably stood empty for three years, until the Danish governor, count Moltke, arrived and found his lodgings uninhabitable and his office space unusable. He managed to have the government fund the reconstruction of the house and moved in with his family and officials.

In 1874, the Icelanders celebrated the Millenium of the inhabitancy of the country, and the Danish king, Christian IX, participated. He also brought along the country’s first constitution and handed it over in the ancient Parliamentary Plains (Thingvellir).

In 1904, Iceland was granted home rule by the Danish government. This announcement was read publicly on the steps of the Cabinet House and the official flag of the country was hoisted in front of it for the first time. Consequently, the house was occupied by the three ministers of the Icelandic government and got its present name.

Today the house is occupied by the offices of the prime minister.

The statues in front of the house are the work of the sculptor, Einar Jonsson, from the years 1915 and 1931. One depicts King Christian IX handing over the constitution in 1874, and the other Hannes Hafstein, who became the first minister of the country in 1904.

Sun Voyager
The Sun Voyager (Sólfari) is a sculpture from August 18th, 1990, by Jón Gunnar Árnason, located next to the Sæbraut road in Reykjavík, Iceland. Sun Voyager is described as a dreamboat or an ode to the Sun. The artist intended it to convey the promise of undiscovered territory, a dream of hope, progress, and freedom.

The work is constructed of quality stainless steel and stands on a circle of granite slabs surrounded by so-called “town-hall concrete”. It was constructed in accordance with Jón Gunnar's enlarged full-scale drawing of Sun Voyager and was overseen by Jón Gunnar's assistant, the artist Kristinn E. Hrafnsson. The engineering of the sculpture was supervised by the technologist, Sigurjón Yngvason, in close cooperation with Jón Gunnar himself, the building itself was carried out by Reynir Hjálmtýsson and his assistant.

Harpa Concert Hall
Harpa is one of Reykjavik‘s greatest and distinguished landmarks. It is a cultural and social center in the heart of the city and features stunning views of the surrounding mountains and the North Atlantic Ocean. Harpa is an enchanting destination for intrigued travelers and its grand-scale award-winning architecture has attracted 7 million guests since its opening, May 4th, 2011.

Harpa Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Centre offers the best facilities for concerts and conferences in Northern Europe. Harpa has received numerous awards and prizes. Harpa was chosen one of the best concert halls of the new millennium by the prestigious music magazine Gramophone magazine and was chosen as the best performance venue in 2011 by Travel & Leisure magazine. In Autumn 2012 Harpa received the prestigious award as the Best MICE Centre in Northern Europe.

Lutheran Cathedral
Around the turn of the 18th century, the episcopate seat Skalholt was moved to the capital and the whole country became one diocese. Before these changes took place it was considered necessary to build a cathedral (Dómkirkjan) in Reykjavik. In 1788 stones were heaped upon the building site during the winter to ensure sufficient building material for the summer. A group of handicraftsmen came from Denmark, but the proceedings were slow because of their drunkenness.

The roof of the church was so badly constructed, that it had to be rebuilt in 1792. Despite these delays, the church was completed and consecrated in 1796, exactly 10 years after the capital had received its municipal rights, and the church could seat most of its inhabitants. The building leaked and was so damp, that people kept away. It was discovered, that most of the wood used for the construction had been rotten from the beginning.

In 1815 the church was condemned by the municipal authorities and two years later it was thoroughly restored. On Whitsunday 1825 one of the roof beams squeaked so much, that the congregation was driven mad with fear and escaped through doors and windows. The baptismal font, made by the sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen, was put up in the church in 1839, and the next year it acquired an organ. The church was reconstructed and enlarged in 1847-1848 and the sand for the masonry was imported from Denmark as if there were no sand to be found in Iceland.

The Danish architect L.A.Winstrup and Danish handicraftsmen were employed for this task and during the next few decades, the church fell into disrepair because of lack of maintenance. This called for a thorough restoration in 1879 by an Icelandic carpenter, who left the church looking like it does today with seats for 600 people. The National Library, The National Museum, and the National Archives were housed in the loft of the church until they were moved to the House of Parliament in 1881. The latest restoration took place in 1999. The architecture of the cathedral is neoclassic.

The House of Parliament
The House of Parliament (Alþingishúsið) was built in 1880 – 1881. It was constructed from hewn blocks of the gray basaltic rock (dolerite) upon which a part of the capital rests. The architect was the Dane F. Meldahl, the director of The Academy of Art in Copenhagen and the Danish mason Bald. The first assembly of the parliament in the new building took place on July 1st, 1881.

The National Library, The National Archives, and the National Museum were housed there for a while until the museum building was ready. The University was housed there from its establishment in 1911 to 1940 when its main building was ready. The Danish governor’s office was there between 1941 and 1944 when the Icelanders proclaimed the republic in the Parliamentary Plains in 1944. The garden behind the building was named after one of the members of Parliament, prime minister and a renowned entrepreneur, Tryggvi Gunnarsson, who lies buried there.

The Pond
Tjörnin is a small, prominent lake in central Reykjavík. Most visitors to the city pass along its shore, as it is situated in the city center next to the Reykjavik City Hall and several museums. Tjörnin means "the lake" or "the pond". Feeding the birds on the lake shores is a popular pastime, so much that it has been referred to as "the biggest bread soup in the world".

Reykjavík City Hall
The idea of a city hall in Reykjavik is almost as old as the city itself. For years the municipal authorities explored the possibility of building a city hall, studied locations, and invited proposals for its design.

It was not until 1987, however, on the initiation of mayor David Oddsson, that the city council decided to build the Reykjavik City Hall on the northern shore of Lake Tjornin, after inviting designs with a competition.

Reykjavik City Hall was completed and inaugurated on April 14th, 1992, a beautiful testimony to the vision of its creators. Within it, city residents and city council officials have a venue to meet and exchange ideas about the future of Iceland’s capital, to enjoy artistic and cultural events, and last but not least, to delight in the unique setting.

The oldest house in Reykjavik
The historic house, Aðalstræti 10 in Reykjavík, was opened to the public by Mayor Dagur B. Eggertsson on Saturday, May 5th, 2018. The house now belongs to Reykjavík City Museum and will be run as an exhibition space. Aðalstræti 10, built-in 1762, is the oldest and one of the city's most important houses, in the heart of the city center. The history of the house and the city of Reykjavík are closely connected. At the time when the house was built, Reykjavík had very few inhabitants and had just started to resemble a village. 140 years later, Reykjavík became the capital of the country. In the back house of Aðalstræti 10, there are two exhibitions called Reykjavík 1918 and A Town of Turf Houses.

Reykjavik Old Harbor
The so-called Old Harbor of Reykjavik is the first lasting harbor of the town. It was constructed between 1913 and 1917 on the cove Reykjavik, after which the farm of the first settler and later the town were named.

In 1911 the town council agreed to construct the harbor, based on the plans of the harbormaster of Kristiania (now Oslo) from 1909. The Danish engineer N.C. Monbergs’ offer for the construction was accepted and the work started in 1913.

Two locomotives were used to transport the building materials from the hills Skolavorduholt and Oskjuhlid to the construction site. The progress was rather quick and the first ship was docked in 1915. increased during the next decades and landfills increased the space by the harbor.

Continuous improvements and landfills have taken place on the spit Orfirisey, where various firms have built their headquarters. In 1960 the town council agreed on a long breakwater between Örfirisey and the island Engey, but this project was not realized. Instead, ideas about freight harbors in the Island Videy Area were accepted and the cement (gravel and asphalt) and Vatnagardar harbors were finished in 1968 and the Holtabakki harbor in 1980-81. The marina was finished in 2003.

The Catholic Church
The first Catholic priests to arrive in Iceland after the Reformation were the Frenchmen Bernard Bernard and Jean-Baptiste Baudoin. They bought the Landakot farmstead in Reykjavík and settled there in the early 19th century. They built a small chapel in 1864. A few years later, a small wooden church was erected by Túngata, close to Landakot. After the First World War, Icelandic Catholics saw the need to build a bigger church for the growing number of Catholics. They decided to build a Neo-Gothic church and entrusted the task to the architect Guðjón Samúelsson. After years of construction, Landakotskirkja was finally sanctified on July 23rd, 1929. It was the largest church in Iceland at the time. Today, Landakotskirkja is a distinct landmark in western Reykjavík.

Grótta Island
The island is connected to the mainland by an isthmus, which is flooded during high tides, and many people walk across at low tides to enjoy the variety of the birdlife and an occasional seal nearby. The land has been and still is subsiding rather quickly and those who have lived in the community for a long time have witnessed the gradual advance of the sea. Near the island is a popular golf course and a beacon for one of the runways of the Reykjavik Airport.

In earlier times a farm occupied the island and the lighthouse standing there was built in 1897. It was restored thoroughly in 1947 and has been maintained well since then. There were fishing outfits on the island as well, when the fisheries were based on open rowing boats.

The National Museum
The National Museum of Iceland (Þjóðminjasafn Íslands) was established on February 24th, 1863, with Jón Árnason the first curator of the Icelandic collection. Previously the items were kept in Danish museums. The second curator, Sigurður Guðmundsson, advocated the creation of an antiquarian collection, and the museum was called the Antiquarian Collection until 1911.

Before settling at its present location in 1950, it was housed in various Reykjavík attics, finally for forty years in the attic of the National Library building on Hverfisgata (Safnahúsið, now the Culture House, Þjóðmenningarhúsið).

A key object in the permanent exhibition is the Valþjófsstaður door, a celebrated carving depicting a version of the Lion-Knight legend where a knight slays a dragon, thus freeing a lion that becomes his companion.

The Pearl
The Pearl (Perlan) is a prominent landmark in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavík. It is situated on the top of Öskjuhlíð hill. What was originally a cluster of hot water tanks was in 1991 converted to a building open to the public. It hosts an exhibition, a planetarium, an observation deck, and a restaurant.

Perlan was designed by architect Ingimundur Sveinsson and opened to the public on June 21st, 1991. The building is composed of an immense glass dome that sits on six hot-water tanks, each carrying 4 million liters of geothermal hot water. All of this is supported by a colossal steel frame, which serves important functions in addition to holding everything together. The framework, hollow on the inside, is actually a gigantic radiator. In the winter when it is cold, hot water runs through the frame, while cold water is used in the summertime.

Reykjavik City Zoo
The decision to build the zoo in Laugardalur Valley was taken by the Reykjavík City Council on April 22nd, 1986. The goal with its establishment was to educate the general public on Icelandic farm animals, give them a closer look at Icelandic farming practices, and strengthen the bond between people and animals. The construction of the zoo began in 1989. Within one year, six structures for animal keeping were built, a seal pond was dug, areas for foxes, minks, and reindeer formed and a goat enclosure set up. In addition to that, the workshop Hafrafell, which painter Örlygur Sigurson owned, was converted into an office and lecture hall. Plans were put in place to keep more than 20 species while letting the animals that live in Iceland have the spotlight, including farm animals and those found in the wild. There are few animals of each type. Efforts are made to display their variations, colors, both sexes, and their offspring. The zoo was opened by then-mayor Davíð Oddson on May 19th, 1990.

Reykjavík Botanic Garden
Reykjavík Botanic Garden (Grasagarðurinn) is a botanical garden located in the district of Laugardalur in Reykjavík that was established on August 18th, 1961 on the 175th anniversary of the city.

The garden currently conserves more than 5,000 plant species in eight plant collections and offers prosperous birdlife, particularly grey geese. One of the many purposes of the institution is education, with guided tours being provided to the public and school groups annually visiting the park. The park is a member of the Botanic Gardens Conservation International organization with the code REYK.

The house at Höfði
Höfði is a house in Reykjavík, Iceland, best known as the location for the 1986 Reykjavík Summit meeting of President Ronald Reagan of the United States and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev of the Soviet Union. That effectively was a step to the end of the Cold War. Within the building, the flags of the United States and the Soviet Union are cross-hung to commemorate the meeting.

The house was built in 1909 and is located at Félagstún. It was initially built for the French Consul and was the exclusive residence of poet and businessman Einar Benediktsson for twelve years (1913-1925). From 1925 to 1937 painter Louisa Matthíasdóttir's family owned the house and resided there.

In the 1940s and 1950s, it was home to the British Embassy in Reykjavík. The city of Reykjavík purchased the house in 1958 and restored it. From then on it has been used for formal receptions and festive occasions.

Open Air Museum in Árbær
This museum is a part of the Municipal History Museum. Its main function is to bring into perspective the way of living, the working conditions and pastime of the people of Reykjavik in the past. The museum also keeps and registers old houses, relics, and antiquities. In 1957 the town council decided to open a park with a collection of old houses of cultural value for the capital. The museum was opened the same summer.

Most of the houses on the museum grounds were removed from the old centre of Reykjavik and their number is constantly growing. They are quite interesting, both outside and inside.

Reykjavík Swimming Pools
Reykjavík City runs seven public thermal pools (sundlaugar) which are heated with geothermal water and are part of the city's policy of encouraging public sports and a healthy lifestyle. The pools offer steam baths, saunas, hot tubs, and jacuzzis. Much is done to ensure the safety of guests and all staff receive regular training and instructions on safety-related issues.

Most of the swimming pools are outdoors. They are open all year round and offer a unique spa-like experience. The pools are heated to about 28° and have several hot tubs to choose from, at various temperatures, ranging from 38°C up to around 45°C. Most thermal baths have steam rooms, and some also have a dry Finnish sauna and cold water tubs to cool down after exercise and saunas.

The Residence of the President
Bessastaðir is today the official residence of the President of Iceland and is situated in Álftanes, not far from the capital city, Reykjavík.

Bessastaðir was first settled in 1000. It became one of Snorri Sturluson's farms in the 13th century. After Snorri's murder in September 1241, Bessastaðir was claimed by the King of Norway. Thereafter it became a Royal stronghold and the dwellings of the King's highest-ranking officers and officials in Iceland. It resisted an attack by Turkish slave raiders in July 1627. In the late 18th century Bessastaðir was changed into a school for a few years, before becoming a farm. In 1867 the farm was purchased by the poet and statesman Grímur Thomsen, who lived there for almost two decades. Among later owners were editor and parliamentarian Skúli Thoroddsen, and his wife, Theodóra Thoroddsen, who was well known for her literary works. In 1940 Sigurður Jónasson bought Bessastaðir and donated it to the state in 1941 as a residence for the Regent and later the President of Iceland.